David Ligare
05/18/11

(via namashco)

03/29/11

MUST WATCH: Levi’s Photo Workshop for Hamburger Eyes Year Book

Levi’s have always supported some good projects, a lot of the time they are housed out of their Photo Workshop based in New York City. This film below presents a new collaboration with photo journal magazine Hamburger Eyes.

Hamburger Eyes is a publication that shares the makers travel and experiences, also acting as a pictorial history book that can be referenced in the future. They use only black and white photography, with contributions from photographers of all levels. From amateur to professional.

In the video, they guide us through this new project that is based on the idea of a yearbook. It consists of countless days and nights of flashbulbs, shutters, and photo booth mugging at the Levi’s Workshop. If you are wondering what the individual photography actually looks like you should click the workshop link below where you can see more.

www.hamburgereyes.com
www.workshopsyearbook.com

02/25/11
To commemorate 50 years of Modern Classics, Penguin will launch a permanent brand new series: the Mini Modern Classics, starting with a set of 50 short stories / novellas including; 
TRUMAN CAPOTE Children on Their BirthdaysRAYMOND CHANDLER Killer in the RainJOSEPH CONRAD YouthF. SCOTT FITZGERALD Babylon RevisitedIAN FLEMING The Living DaylightsHENRY JAMES The Beast in the JungleJAMES JOYCE Two GallantsFRANZ KAFKA In the Penal ColonyRUDYARD KIPLING ‘They’VLADIMIR NABOKOV Terra IncognitaFRANK O’CONNOR The Cornet-Player Who Betrayed IrelandP. G. WODEHOUSE The Crime Wave at BlandingsVIRGINIA WOOLF The Lady in the Looking-Glass
Buy it here, or enter to win it here.
Penguin Modern Classics began in 1961, when an unconventional Penguin editor – Tony Godwin – decided that authors of his time were producing books that deserved classic status just as much as the works of Dickens or Homer. Many of the early titles published in the list (including Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis, Carson McCuller’s The Heart is a Lonely Hunter and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby) are still considered landmark classics.The result was Penguin Modern Classics, with their distinctive grey spines and evocative pictorial covers. Many of them were given eye-opening, avant-garde images by the legendary designer Germano Facetti…via PenguinUK

To commemorate 50 years of Modern Classics, Penguin will launch a permanent brand new series: the Mini Modern Classics, starting with a set of 50 short stories / novellas including;

TRUMAN CAPOTE Children on Their Birthdays
RAYMOND CHANDLER Killer in the Rain
JOSEPH CONRAD Youth
F. SCOTT FITZGERALD Babylon Revisited
IAN FLEMING The Living Daylights
HENRY JAMES The Beast in the Jungle
JAMES JOYCE Two Gallants
FRANZ KAFKA In the Penal Colony
RUDYARD KIPLING ‘They’
VLADIMIR NABOKOV Terra Incognita
FRANK O’CONNOR The Cornet-Player Who Betrayed Ireland
P. G. WODEHOUSE The Crime Wave at Blandings
VIRGINIA WOOLF The Lady in the Looking-Glass

Buy it here, or enter to win it here.

Penguin Modern Classics began in 1961, when an unconventional Penguin editor – Tony Godwin – decided that authors of his time were producing books that deserved classic status just as much as the works of Dickens or Homer. Many of the early titles published in the list (including Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis, Carson McCuller’s The Heart is a Lonely Hunter and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby) are still considered landmark classics.

The result was Penguin Modern Classics, with their distinctive grey spines and evocative pictorial covers. Many of them were given eye-opening, avant-garde images by the legendary designer Germano Facetti…
via PenguinUK
02/17/11

James Brown - Please, Please, Please

02/17/11

ENTER THE VOID Opening Credits (Dir. Gasper Noé; 2010)

What a beautiful character study, the opening credits are prefect. It is filled with expertly shots scenes that seem to be a homage to Kubrick’s and Hitchcock’s classic tracking shots, this film embodies the creeping sense of isolation in our world, questions of existence. Gaspar Noé describes the film’s subject as “the sentimentality of mammals and the shimmering vacuity of the human experience.” The dramaturgy after Oscar’s death is loosely based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead and ends with the spirit’s search for a way to reincarnate. However the director, who considers himself completely non-religious, says that “the whole movie is a dream of someone who read The Tibetan Book of the Dead, and heard about it before being [shot by a gun]. It’s not the story of someone who dies, flies and is reincarnated, it’s the story of someone who is stoned when he gets shot and who has an intonation of his own dream.” This movie should be nominated for Best Director, Best Film Editing and most definitely Art Direction.

02/14/11
Tony Katai
02/10/11
"I cannot set my own freedom as a goal without also setting the freedom of others as a goal."
— Jean-Paul Sartre (via human-voices)
02/09/11
Tim Barber
02/07/11
Alfred Hitchcock
02/07/11