christopherschreck:


“The sixteen books Ed Ruscha produced between 1963 and 1978 are objects with dual personalities. On their covers, as in his paintings, Ruscha delights in enigmatic wording and phraseology, the depiction of words as a subject in itself, typography as both form and content, and the exploration of variations in physical format. On the exterior, when their covers are seen together, the books seem to form a miniature retrospective of Ruscha’s paintings from that period, revealing a relationship between these apparently disparate aspects of his work. To perceive the covers as little paintings thus provides some insight into the conception of Ruscha’s paintings and adds credence to his statement that he’d envisioned the title and cover of Twentysix Gasoline Stations first, as if it were a painting, and then took the pictures to conform to it. This visual relationship helps to account for the fact that Ruscha painted the edges of several canvases as if they were spines of books and, conversely, that he made numerous drawings and prints of the book covers, which are such curious subjects for depiction.”
(above:Twentysix Gasoline Stations Slant, 1963. Graphite, colored pencil, pen, and ink on paper)

christopherschreck:

“The sixteen books Ed Ruscha produced between 1963 and 1978 are objects with dual personalities. On their covers, as in his paintings, Ruscha delights in enigmatic wording and phraseology, the depiction of words as a subject in itself, typography as both form and content, and the exploration of variations in physical format. On the exterior, when their covers are seen together, the books seem to form a miniature retrospective of Ruscha’s paintings from that period, revealing a relationship between these apparently disparate aspects of his work. To perceive the covers as little paintings thus provides some insight into the conception of Ruscha’s paintings and adds credence to his statement that he’d envisioned the title and cover of Twentysix Gasoline Stations first, as if it were a painting, and then took the pictures to conform to it. This visual relationship helps to account for the fact that Ruscha painted the edges of several canvases as if they were spines of books and, conversely, that he made numerous drawings and prints of the book covers, which are such curious subjects for depiction.”

(above:Twentysix Gasoline Stations Slant, 1963. Graphite, colored pencil, pen, and ink on paper)

12/26/12