itwonlast:

Graphic Design: History in the Writing received a brief mention in OBlog, but I’d like to return to the book because this collection is an extremely useful volume that anyone with an interest in graphic design history should see. It’s also a very heartening initiative. The book’s publication by Occasional Papers — a small imprint started by Belgian designer Sara De Bondt and art historian Antony Hudek — is a sign that the project of graphic design history is passing to a new generation, as it must if it’s going to develop. The book opens with Massimo Vignelli’s much-cited, agenda-setting keynote from a 1983 symposium about graphic design history at Rochester Institute of Technology: “We’ve got to insert some level of culture, some level of history, some level of philosophy,” he insists. “We need to provide a cultural structure to our profession.” The editors choose to date the emergence of graphic design history as a mission and a putative discipline from this point. (via)

itwonlast:

Graphic Design: History in the Writing received a brief mention in OBlog, but I’d like to return to the book because this collection is an extremely useful volume that anyone with an interest in graphic design history should see. It’s also a very heartening initiative. The book’s publication by Occasional Papers — a small imprint started by Belgian designer Sara De Bondt and art historian Antony Hudek — is a sign that the project of graphic design history is passing to a new generation, as it must if it’s going to develop.

The book opens with Massimo Vignelli’s much-cited, agenda-setting keynote from a 1983 symposium about graphic design history at Rochester Institute of Technology: “We’ve got to insert some level of culture, some level of history, some level of philosophy,” he insists. “We need to provide a cultural structure to our profession.” The editors choose to date the emergence of graphic design history as a mission and a putative discipline from this point. (via)

06/24/12