blastedheath:

Raoul Dufy (French, 1877-1953), Nogent-sur-Marne, 1934. Oil on canvas, 97.5 x 130.5 cm.

blastedheath:

Raoul Dufy (French, 1877-1953), Nogent-sur-Marne, 1934. Oil on canvas, 97.5 x 130.5 cm.

04/13/14
urgetocreate:

Claude Monet, Olive Tree Wood in the Moreno Garden, 1884

urgetocreate:

Claude Monet, Olive Tree Wood in the Moreno Garden, 1884

04/13/14
blastedheath:

Raoul Dufy (French, 1877-1953), Le Quintette, c.1948. Oil on canvas, 33 x 41 cm.

blastedheath:

Raoul Dufy (French, 1877-1953), Le Quintette, c.1948. Oil on canvas, 33 x 41 cm.

04/13/14
blastedheath:

André Lhote (French, 1885-1962), Le Port de Bordeaux, c.1917. Oil on paper laid down on canvas, 51.5 x 74 cm.

blastedheath:

André Lhote (French, 1885-1962), Le Port de Bordeaux, c.1917. Oil on paper laid down on canvas, 51.5 x 74 cm.

04/13/14
communicants:

Rebels of the Neon God (Tsai Ming-liang, 1992)

communicants:

Rebels of the Neon God (Tsai Ming-liang, 1992)

04/13/14
"In 1953 Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot premiered at a tiny avant-garde theatre in Paris; within five years, it had been translated into more than twenty languages and seen by more than a million spectators. Its startling popularity marked the emergence of a new type of theatre whose proponents – Beckett, Adamov, Ionesco, Genet, Pinter, and others – shattered dramatic conventions and paid scant attention to psychological realism, while highlighting their characters’ inability to understand one another. In 1961, Martin Esslin gave a name to the phenomenon in his ground-breaking study of these playwrights who dramatized the absurdity at the core of the human condition.
Over five decades after its initial publication, Esslin’s landmark book has lost none of its freshness. Authoritative, engaging, and eminently readable, The Theatre of the Absurd is nothing short of a classic: vital reading for anyone with an interest in the theatre.” [via]
First published by Anchor Books, 1961 Second edition first published by Pelican Books, 1968 Third edition first published by Pelican Books, 1980
Review (Lionel Abel, Partisan Review, Summer 1962, pp 454-459)
Publisher
Esslin’s article preceding the book (The Tulane Drama Review 4:4, May 1960)View online (1972 Pelican Books reprint of the second edition [1968], 463 pp, at Archive.org)Download (1991 Penguin Books reprint of the third edition [1980], 480 pp, 58 MB, no OCR), Alt link

"In 1953 Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot premiered at a tiny avant-garde theatre in Paris; within five years, it had been translated into more than twenty languages and seen by more than a million spectators. Its startling popularity marked the emergence of a new type of theatre whose proponents – Beckett, Adamov, Ionesco, Genet, Pinter, and others – shattered dramatic conventions and paid scant attention to psychological realism, while highlighting their characters’ inability to understand one another. In 1961, Martin Esslin gave a name to the phenomenon in his ground-breaking study of these playwrights who dramatized the absurdity at the core of the human condition.

Over five decades after its initial publication, Esslin’s landmark book has lost none of its freshness. Authoritative, engaging, and eminently readable, The Theatre of the Absurd is nothing short of a classic: vital reading for anyone with an interest in the theatre.” [via]

First published by Anchor Books, 1961
Second edition first published by Pelican Books, 1968
Third edition first published by Pelican Books, 1980

Review (Lionel Abel, Partisan Review, Summer 1962, pp 454-459)

Publisher

Esslin’s article preceding the book (The Tulane Drama Review 4:4, May 1960)
View online (1972 Pelican Books reprint of the second edition [1968], 463 pp, at Archive.org)
Download (1991 Penguin Books reprint of the third edition [1980], 480 pp, 58 MB, no OCR), Alt link

04/13/14
"Two issues of a “Bay Area Dada” magazine from the mid-1970s.
The first one is a collection of short poems by over 40 authors including Anna Banana, Ken Friedman, and Genesis P. Orridge.
The latter issue features pen and ink drawings by Opal L. Nations divided into four sections entitled “On the Study of Genetics”, “On Physical Culture”, “On the Art of Surgery” and “Some General Observations”. [via]
Edited by Carlo Giovanni Cicatelli (aka Charles Chickadel) Associate Editor: Carol Ann See Publisher Trinity Press, San Francisco via Matt Wellins
Commentary (John Held Jr.)
Volume III, Number 10 (Summer 1975, 49 pp)Volume III, Number 12 (Winter 1975-76, 44 pp)

"Two issues of a “Bay Area Dada” magazine from the mid-1970s.

The first one is a collection of short poems by over 40 authors including Anna Banana, Ken Friedman, and Genesis P. Orridge.

The latter issue features pen and ink drawings by Opal L. Nations divided into four sections entitled “On the Study of Genetics”, “On Physical Culture”, “On the Art of Surgery” and “Some General Observations”. [via]

Edited by Carlo Giovanni Cicatelli (aka Charles Chickadel)
Associate Editor: Carol Ann See
Publisher Trinity Press, San Francisco
via Matt Wellins

Commentary (John Held Jr.)

Volume III, Number 10 (Summer 1975, 49 pp)
Volume III, Number 12 (Winter 1975-76, 44 pp)

04/13/14
blastedheath:

Raoul Dufy (French, 1877-1953), Le Pin [The pine], 1927. Oil on canvas, 73 x 92 cm.

blastedheath:

Raoul Dufy (French, 1877-1953), Le Pin [The pine], 1927. Oil on canvas, 73 x 92 cm.

(via ryannordkitchen)

04/13/14
blastedheath:

Miquel Barceló (Spanish, b. 1957), Cuina Mallorquina, 1985. Mixed media on canvas, 200 x 300 cm.

blastedheath:

Miquel Barceló (Spanish, b. 1957), Cuina Mallorquina, 1985. Mixed media on canvas, 200 x 300 cm.

04/13/14
blastedheath:

Pavlos Rodokanakis (Greek, 1891-1958), The Fountain. Oil on board, 28 x 29.5 cm.

blastedheath:

Pavlos Rodokanakis (Greek, 1891-1958), The Fountain. Oil on board, 28 x 29.5 cm.

04/13/14